REVIEWS

Sun-Tzu's Life

in the Holy City of Vilnius

"This is a wonderful witty romp through Soviet and post-Soviet Lithuania."

The modern novel blog

"Sun-Tzu's Life is, in many respects, an unusual novel, making for a different kind of reading experience." 

The complete-review

Vilnius Poker

"[T]he very things that make these first 300 pages trying are the things that make them unique, even exhilarating"

Evening all afternoon

"The nightmarish national trauma of Lithuania clouds everything, but also connects everything, opening spaces for shared memory and emotion."

The Believer

"[This} is a forceful statement that is on its way towards becoming a touchstone of 20th Century literature."

Bookslut.com

"Gavelis’s urban grunge and his portrayal of the bleakness and absurdity of Soviet life provide the perfect backdrop for what, at times, is a curiously hilarious novel."

Lituanus

"The Reception of a Soviet Novel in the North American Market"

Textual Cultures, Indiana University

"The Lithuanian capital itself, a gray, monotonous Soviet city that Gavelis renders with startling and brutal clarity, offers ... no escape."

Washington City Paper

 

"There’s a lot here: passion, madmen, crushed hope, a stinking city and the stench of human rubble."

Rain Taxi

 

"What Joyce did for Dublin, Gavelis has in mind to do for the capital of Lithuania: chide it, gossip about it, and bore it into the memory of those who may never visit it."

Barnes and Noble Review

"Vilnius Poker should be essential reading for those seeking to understand the tortured, complex psychology of a small (European) nation under foreign (Russian/Soviet) rule."

Slavic and East European Journal

 

"Gavelis’ vision ... recalls both the alternate worlds of Stanislas Lem (and, for that matter, Richard Price) and the acerbity of Vilnius-born Csezlaw Milosz."

Kirkus Reviews

 

"Those willing to devote the required mental energy ... will be rewarded with a supremely interesting literary experience."

Literary License

Frank Kruk

 

"What would a Horatio Alger story look like if it were written by a Lithuanian communist who had never been to the United States and who was determined to sling satire in all directions? Frank Kruk ... would be the answer."

Vilnius Review

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